Fiction by Idrissa Simmonds
Fiction / Issue 8

Fiction by Idrissa Simmonds

On the Other Side My father gave me one thing in this life: a brown-skinned Rainbow Brite doll. When I was a kid sometimes I would get jealous of the doll and pull out her black yarn hair in chunkfuls. Even a silly doll had more life to her hair than me. Still, I feel … Continue reading

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Fiction by Thomas Kearnes
Fiction / Issue 8

Fiction by Thomas Kearnes

Simone I’ve never tricked with a guy from a group home. I was compelled to press palms with the house manager, a beefy black dude decked out in Adidas, and he insisted that I articulate my promise to return Darren sober and unharmed by midnight. We get high before leaving the subdivision. The bedbugs and … Continue reading

Fiction by Mya Byrne
Fiction / Issue 8

Fiction by Mya Byrne

Chain of Rocks “I swear I saw a sign for Chicago,” Ma said, holding the battered Esso map on her lap.   “Sun’s going down fast,” said Pa, for the fifth time in twenty minutes. Then, for the first time, “Don’t know where we are.” The wooden spokes of the old Hudson vibrated on the rough … Continue reading

Fiction by Todd Wellman
Fiction / Issue 7

Fiction by Todd Wellman

The boy and girl were laid out at the mortuary a week after Jamil’s funeral. For those who considered the thickness of hair currency, the children were rich. The townspeople, to observe the fear that devils could appear to buckle the children’s crowns, guarded the children, danced to distract themselves. Continue reading

Fiction by Alexandra Watson
Fiction / Issue 7

Fiction by Alexandra Watson

Criminal “Love is never better than the lover. Wicked people love wickedly, violent people love violently, weak people love weakly, stupid people love stupidly, but the love of a free man is never safe.”     —Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye   The winter I move back to my hometown—, degree-bearing, jobless, staying at mom’s—I’m remembering why … Continue reading

Fiction by Kyle Getz
Fiction / Issue 6

Fiction by Kyle Getz

It all started when dad made me sign up for football. I was really little, and when I told him I didn’t want to, he said, “It will turn you into the man you’re going to become,” and we didn’t say anything else for the rest of the car ride. And, looking back on it, I guess he was right, but not for the reasons he thought. Continue reading